Immigrant And Veteran Marijuana Protections, Along With Hemp And CBD Measures,

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House lawmakers approved several spending bills on Wednesday that touch on a wide range of cannabis-related policy issues, including immigration eligibility for people who use marijuana, benefits for military veterans who work in the industry and regulations on hemp and CBD.

It was a busy day for the House Appropriations Committee, where two of the spending bills that contain cannabis provisions were marked up by the full panel and another got a vote in a subcommittee.

This comes one day after the full committee approved legislation that includes language providing protections for banks that work with state-legal marijuana businesses and notably excludes a prior rider that bans Washington, D.C. from using its tax dollars to allow adult-use cannabis sales. The committee also adopted a related report that urges federal agencies to reconsider policies that result in the firing of employees who use marijuana legally in accordance with state law.

Here’s a breakdown of the new cannabis provisions lawmakers will be considering on Wednesday: 

In an spending bill that allocates fiscal year 2022 funding for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), there’s a provision that would prevent its component agencies from denying any person immigration benefits or protections, or penalizing them in an application, simply because they’ve admitted to using cannabis or were convicted of a low-level marijuana offense.

According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), a person who admits to using cannabis—even in compliance with state law—is morally unfit for citizenship. The agency clarified that position in a 2019 memo, adding that employment in a state-legal marijuana market is another factor that could impact a person’s immigration status.

Standalone legislation has been introduced this session to resolve the problem, but it has yet to be acted on. While this new component of the spending bill that was advanced by the Homeland Security Subcommittee Appropriations Subcommittee would help address the issue, it does not seem that it would specifically help immigrants who work in the marijuana market.

“SEC. 533. No Federal funds may be used by the Department of Homeland Security to deny any benefit, application for admission, or protection available to an individual under the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101 et. seq.) on the sole basis of any event, conduct, finding, admission, history of addiction or abuse, arrest, juvenile adjudication, or conviction related to cannabis possession, consumption, or use.”

The full Appropriations Committee also approved a bill that includes a report acknowledging that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has clarified that veterans are eligible for home loan benefits even if they work in a state-legal marijuana industry. However, it expresses disappointment that VA hasn’t taken further action to communicate this policy to lenders and borrowers.

The new report directs VA to improve that communication and report back to Congress on its progress within 180 days of the enactment of the legislation.

Rep. Katherine Clark (D-MA) and other lawmakers have pressed VA on difficulties some veterans have faced in securing the benefit, with at least one constituent telling Clark that they were denied a home loan because of their work in the state-legal cannabis market. That prompted the congresswoman to circulate a sign-on letter and introduce an amendment to resolve the problem.

Clark’s amendment to address the problem was approved by the House as part of a previous defense spending bill—though leaders in the chamber agreed to scrap it after the Senate didn’t include it in its version of the legislation.

“Home Loan Income Verification.—The Committee understands that as directed by House Report 116–63, VA has clarified that nothing in VA statutes or regulations specifically prohibits a Veteran whose income is derived from state-legalized cannabis activities from obtaining a certificate of eligibility for VA home loan benefits. The Committee is disappointed with VA’s inaction on the directive included in House Report 116–445 and again directs the VA to improve communication with eligible lending institutions to reduce confusion among lenders and borrowers on this matter and to report to the Committee on progress made no later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act.”

The report also notes “progress” that VA has made when it comes to marijuana research. However, advocates have been critical of the agency in this respect. For example, VA offered written testimony this month opposing a bill expand  clinical trials into the therapeutic potential of cannabis for military veterans with PTSD and chronic pain.

“Cannabis Research.—The Committee notes that VA has made progress on cannabis research and continues to request updates on the status of this research, as described in House Report 116–63.”

“I hope that the VA will send this update on the study that the department said they would send to us promptly,” Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA) said during the committee markup. “States and localities, they’re already using cannabis for management of pain and other medical conditions, and so it’s really time for the federal government to catch up.”

Then, there are a host of provisions on hemp and its derivatives like CBD in another spending bill and attached report that covers funding for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

In the report, lawmakers took issue with the 2018 Farm Bill’s 0.3 percent THC cap for lawful hemp products and directed USDA to work with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) on a study of whether that threshold is scientifically backed.

“Hemp.—The Committee is concerned that the level of allowable THC content in hemp may be arbitrary and pose a burden on hemp producers that is not supported by science. The Committee directs USDA to work with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to study and report to Congress on whether there is scientific basis for the current limit of .3% THC in hemp and suggest alternative levels if necessary.”

Further, the panel identified an issue in the legislation that advocates have pushed back against that prohibits people with felony drug convictions from participating in the hemp market for 10 years post-release. The report emphasizes that this policy has a disproportionate impact on people of color who have been most impacted by the war on drugs.

To that end, USDA is directed to analyze those barriers to entry for disparately impacted communities and report back with recommendations on how to ensure that the industry is equitable.

“The 2018 Farm Bill included a provision that restricted participation in legalized hemp production of any individual convicted of a drug-related felony for 10 years after their date of conviction, unless they are part of a hemp pilot program authorized by the 2014 farm bill. This drug felony ban will disproportionately impact communities of color and create another barrier to entry in the hemp industry to populations targeted by past drug policies. The Committee directs USDA to identify barriers to entry for communities of color and provide recommendations on how to ensure communities of color have equal access and opportunity to participate in the hemp industry.”

The committee additionally flagged another problem that hemp industry stakeholders have raised concerning the hemp extraction process. While hemp is defined under federal statute as containing no more than 0.3 percent THC, those levels can temporarily increase when extracts are being processed, and businesses have expressed concern that they may be liable to enforcement action in that interim period because of a lapse in regulatory guidance….

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